Widefield Imaging

These images are heavily compressed to make them download more quickly - if you would like to see the full size hi-res version please visit my Flickr album or click on the images below.

Many people when seeing these images ask - 'what is it' - followed by 'how big is it' and 'how far away is it'. I have included some relevant information about each image.

All these images were taken from our back garden on the West Coast of Scotland over the last 3 years.

Milky Way - 17th Sept 2020 - The plan was to image the Milky Way at the Nether Largie standing stones at Kilmartin. Started off well and the intention was to take a fair number of subs with the Star Adventurer then take a separate image of the foreground (standing stones) without tracking to be combined in post processing. The Milky Way has come out reasonably well but the fog rolled in preventing any foreground shots. You can see the mist and murk forming at the bottom of the image. So not a complete waste of time but far from the image I wanted. Lets think of it as a learning opportunity rather than a 4 hour drive and nearly getting lost in a dark foggy field !! This is 30 x 60 second subs tracked and stacked - Canon D5 Mk1 Classic ISO 1600, Tokina 11 - 16 f2.8 lens - Star Adventurer. Stacked in Sequator and lightly processed in Photoshop.

The Moon - 31st May 2020 - 150 x 1/125 @ f5.6 ISO 100 photographs stacked and processed to reveal the true colours of the moon. Canon EOS 70D - Skywatcher ED72 Evostar - no tracking - just a sturdy tripod, remote release and mirror locked up. Processed in PIPP, Pixinsight and Photoshop.

The Moon - 28th May 2020 - 50 x 1/125 @ f5.6 ISO 100 photographs stacked and processed to reveal the true colours of the moon. Canon EOS 70D - Skywatcher ED72 Evostar - no tracking - just a sturdy tripod, remote release and mirror locked up. Processed in PIPP, Pixinsight and Photoshop.

12th April 2020 - a bit more progress with the 'All Sky' camera


I am trying to build an 'All Sky camera' - the idea is to take 45 second images from dusk until dawn then stitch the into a time-lapse. This should capture aurora, meteors, clouds, constellations and any visiting aliens ;-) It isn't quite right yet but I am getting there slowly! This is where I am up to. If you fancy a go the instructions are here. The code for a Raspberry Pi is here.

Untitled-1.m4v

24th October 2019 - (Below) Well Aurora hunting didn't go well - it was very low to the horizon and we have a 2000' hill to the north so it has to be epic to rise above the hill. Seems a shame to dump 350 subs so I stacked them to make a star trail photo. Anyone still think the earth is flat ???

Above - Partial lunar eclipse 10th Feb 2017 - this was about a hour before the maximum eclipse. Taken with an iPhone held up to the eyepiece of a £90 scope - astro-imaging doesn't have to be expensive !!!

Timelapse of lunar eclipse

Timelapse of star movement

Aurora - Canon 1100d - Samyang 14mm - ISO 800 - 20 seconds exp.

Aurora from NYE 2015/16 Canon 70d - Samyang 14mm - ISO 800 - 20 sec. exp

Aurora with star trails - Canon 1100D - 50 x 20 sec exp - ISO800 - Samyang 14mm lens

Above and below - Comet Catalina - Canon 1100D - SW ED80 telescope

Mars - Canon 100d - SW ED80 telescope

Above and below - The Moon - Canon 1100D - Skywatcher ED80

Above - Aurora without and with star trails - Canon 70D - Samyang 14mm - ISO 1600 - 25 second exp. (x 30)

Jupiter and 3 of her moons. Canon 1100D - Skywatcher ED80

Above and below - Constellation of Orion - Canon 1100D - 14mm Samyang and lines pointing to comet Catalina - see above.

Our nearest star- by far !! The Sun. Canon 1100D - SW ED80 and Baader solar film.

The Milky Way - and a random shooting star!

Above - Star trails - showing how little Polaris moves (centre of the concentric circles)

Having some fun with friends on NYE 2015/16 - caught the Aurora by accident.